قالب وردپرس درنا توس
Home https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ Entertainment https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ Director of "Singin" at Stanley Donne's Dying Dies at 94

Director of "Singin" at Stanley Donne's Dying Dies at 94



Movie director Stanley Donne, a giant of the Hollywood musical, who through such classics as "Singin in the Rain" and "Funny Face" helped give us some of the happiest sounds and images in the history of cinema, died. He was 94. Donn, who often collaborated with Jean Kelly, but also worked with Cary Grant, Frank Sinatra and Fred Aster, died on Thursday in New York from heart failure, his sons Joshua and Mark Donan reaffirmed Saturday. The first era for Hollywood musicals and no film director helped charm, than Donen, among the last ones you are who lived from that era and one of those who wanted to expand the boundaries of surrealistic song and dance, was part of the unit for such unforgettable scenes as Kelly dances with an animated Jerry-mouse in Aweigh's Anchor, playing Astra's hard-spinning through the ceiling in the Royal weddings ", and, sometime triumphant, Kelly splashed ecstatically Steven Spielberg reminded Donen as" a friend and an early mentor, "for whom life and film were inseparable. 60s to shoot students like me to learn how to tell history and the placement of lenses and directors, that's the time and I will never forget, "Spielberg said on Saturday. Director Guillermo del Toro said: "Before the actors Stanley Donen danced. He made the camera dance and sing colors. " The 2007 American Film Institute's 2007 Top 1

00 American Film Institute ranked "Singin" in the rain with its inventive glance at Hollywood's transition from silent to speaking in the 1920s and the famous Kelly's 5. In 2002, Donne was asked , or known film makers that Singin 'in the Rain, released in 1952, as well as Debbie Reynolds and Donald O'New, Connor, appeared decades later. can not go through the movie if you do not think it's good, "he said. – Of course, we thought it was good. More? I do not know. You do not think about it. You just think about how you can do it. " And the film and Donin were initially underestimated. "Singin" in the rain was initially considered as a great entertainment, and not as an art, and was not even intended for the best painting or directorial prize "Academy". Donne, Kelly's eclipses at the start of his career, never received a competitive Oscar nomination and waited until 1998 for the honorary award given to him by Martin Scorsese. He was more than ready. Donen danced his cheek to his cheek with his Oscar statue, which he called "this cute little fella." The crowd shouted and applauded as he crooned, "Heaven, I'm in heaven," with Irving Berlin, "Cheka to Cheek." During his speech, he explained his formula for a great musical. Bring songwriters like Adolf Green and Betty Comden, as well as performers like Kelly or Aster or Sinatra. "And when the shooting begins," he added, "you are, and you stay out of the way." Donan was born in Columbia, South Carolina, remembering films – especially those from Aster and Ginger Rogers – as a necessary escape from the tension to be one of the few Jews in their community. He took dance lessons in adolescence and began his career as a show business as an artist dancing in the original Broad Broadcasting show "Pal Joey" at age 16. Keel played the lead, and the success of the show pushed Kelly to the movie Dan to receive his first Hollywood break when Kelly got a job helping Kellie's Cover Girl movie choreography in 1944. Over the next few years, he has been working on choreography for films such as The Kissing Bandit, starring Sinatra and Me Out to the Ballgame, starring Sinatra and Kelly who have joined Donn on choreography: Singin 'in the Rain' was one of the three films attributed to Kelly and Donen as co-directors; others were "To The City", 1949, the Kelli-Sinatra musical on sailors on vacation in New York, and the dark "It's always a fair weather", in which three friends of the soldiers reunited ten years later. Rareness in the films – came out of the tense relationship between Donne and the star, who played such an important role in advancing Donna's car. Donin later expressed indignation about Kelly, who died in 1996, as cold and compassionate and not fully appreciate his contributions. They parted forever after "It's always fair weather", which came out in 1955. "It could have been difficult with me and everyone else," said The New York Times director in 1996. "It has always been a complex collaboration." Donny films included "Seven Brides for the Seven Brothers" (1954), with its excellent sports choreography; "Damn Yankees" (1958), a remake of the Broadway breakdown of the temptation of baseball fans; and "Funny Face", in which Aster has teamed up with Audrey Hepburn to play a fashion photographer and is unlikely to be a muse. Aster's character in "Funny Face" was built on the model of Richard Avedon, and the famous photographer served as Donena's advisor. it's more fun than finding someone who stimulates you and who you can stimulate, "Donin said in John Coball's book," It's necessary to sing to dance: the graphic history of musical films. "The Result, not just add to two and two, multiplying , and you find yourself doing much better – you are both enthralled at the crest of excitement. "Donin worked in different genres. The "Indiscreet" (1958) was a lightweight farce in which Grant and Ingrid Bergman played, and "Two for the Road" (1967), with Hepburn and Albert Finne, was an extremely tense and intense family comedy of his time, far from carefree. the spirit of his musicals. (Don Jenny was married at least once and had an embroidered pillow in his apartment in New York, reading "YOUR PASSWORD AND RETURN"). One of Donin's films, the elegant mystery of Sharad (1963), reminded the audience about the Hitchcock thriller. Sharada starred with Hopburn as a premature socialist whose husband was killed, and Grant – who appeared in four Hitchcock films – as a mysterious person who may or may not help her. "Does not have a genre". Donin had three sons; Peter, the oldest, died in 2003 from a heart attack at the age of 50. His first wife, dancer Zhanna Coyne, later married Keli. His fourth wife was the star of the screen of Yvette Mimiyo. Over the past two decades, his companion was film director-comedian Elaine May. None of his latest films has approached the heights of his most famous work. Nadir may have been in 1984 "Blame him on Rio", a comedy about a man (Michael Kane), who has a romance with his young daughter's friend. Roger Ebert conceived the film as "clearly intended to address the brutal interests of dirty old people of all ages." Other loans include the music segment for the 1980s television comedy "Moonlighting" and the stage production of Red Shoe. In 1999, he led ABC's "Love Letters" television film, which featured Steven Weber and Laura Linnaeus: "There is a limit on television," Donen said. wonder within limits. I'm always looking for limits, because then you have to be creative.

Director Stanley Donne, a giant of the Hollywood musical, which through such classics as "Singin in the Rain" and "Funny Face" helped give us the most joyful sounds and images in history. movie, died. He was 94 years old.

Donen, who often collaborated with Jean Kelly, but also worked with Cary Grant, Frank Sinatra and Fred Aster, died on Thursday in New York City from heart failure, his sons Joshua and Mark Donan reaffirmed Saturday.

1940s and 50s were the first era for Hollywood musicals, and none of the filmmakers favored the charm of Donen, among the last survivors of that era, and wishing to widen the boundaries of songs and dances to surrealistic ones. He was part of the unit for such unforgettable scenes as Kelly dances with the animated Jerry-Mouse at Aweigh's Anchor, playing Astri's hard-spinning through the ceiling at the Royal Wedding, and, once triumphant, Kelly splashed ecstatically

Stephen Spielberg reminded Donen as "a friend and an early mentor," for which life and film were inseparable.

"His generosity in the transfer of many of his weekends in the late 60's to shoot students like me to learn how to tell stories and to place lenses and directors is a time that I'll never forget," Spielberg said. on Saturday. Donny actors sang, actors danced. He made the camera dance, and the colors sang. "

A review of the American Film Institute 2007 on the top 100 American films ranked "Singin in the rain," with his inventive move to Hollywood from a quiet to colloquial picture of the 1920s and the famous Kelly dance in the shower, No. 5.

Donen was asked in 2002 whether the well-known filmmakers that "Singin in the Rain", released in 1952, as well as Debbie Reynolds and Donald O'Neill, would play the lead role.

"You can not go through a movie if you do not think it's good," he said. – Of course, we thought it was good. More? I do not know. You do not think about it. You just think about how you can do it. "

And the film and Donne were initially underestimated. "Singin" in the rain was initially considered as a great entertainment, and not as an art, and was not even intended for the best painting or directorial prize "Academy". Donne, Kelly's eclipses at the start of his career, never received a competitive Oscar nomination and waited until 1998 for the honorary award given to him by Martin Scorsese. He was more than ready. Donen danced his cheek to his cheek with his Oscar statue, which he called "this cute little fella." The crowd shouted and applauded as he crooned, "Heaven, I'm in heaven," with Irving Berlin, "Cheka to Cheek."

During his speech, he explained his formula of the great musical. Bring songwriters like Adolf Green and Betty Comden, as well as performers like Kelly or Aster or Sinatra. "And when the shooting begins," he added, "you are and staying out of the way."

Born in Columbia, South Carolina, Donne Memorial Movies – especially those with Aster and Ginger Rogers – It was necessary to escape the tension, being one of the few Jews in their community. He took dance lessons in adolescence and began his career as a show business as an artist dancing in the original Broad Broadcasting show "Pal Joey" at age 16. Kelly played the lead role, and the success of the show pushed Kelly to the movie

Donen received his first Hollywood break when Kelly got a job helping Kelly's choreography film Cover Girl in 1944. Over the next few years, he has been working on choreography for films such as The Kissing Bandit, starring Sinatra, and Take Me to the Ball, starring Sinatra and Kelly, who have joined Donn on choreography. .

"Singin in the Rain" was one of three films assigned to Kelly and Donen as co-directors; others were "To The City", the Keli-Sinatra musical of 1949 on sailors on vacation in New York, and the dark "It's always an honest weather," in which three soldier friends reunited ten years later. Directed loans – rare in films – came out of intense relationships between Donne and the star who played such an important role in promoting Donna's career. Donin later expressed indignation about Kelly, who died in 1996, as cold and compassionate and not fully appreciate his contributions. They went away forever after "It's always fair weather", which came out in 1955.

"He could have been difficult with me and everybody else," said The New York Times director in 1996.

Other Donan films included "The Seven Brides for the Seven Brothers" (1954), with its excellent sports choreography; "Damn Yankees" (1958), a remake of the Broadway breakdown of the temptation of baseball fans; and "Funny Face", in which Aster teamed up with Audrey Hepburn to play a fashion photographer and his unlikely muse.

Aster's character in "Funny Face" was built according to Richard Avedon's model, and the famous photographer worked as a consultant to Donen

"Nothing is more fun than finding someone who stimulates you and who you can stimulate," Donen said. John Kobal's book "It's necessary to sing to dance: a beautiful film story". than simply adding up to two and two, is multiplied, and you find that you are doing much better – you both admire the crest of excitement. "

Donin worked in different genres. The "Indiscreet" (1958) was a lightweight farce in which Grant and Ingrid Bergman played, and "Two for the Road" (1967), with Hepburn and Albert Finne, was an extremely tense and intense family comedy of his time, far from carefree. the spirit of his musicals. (Don Den was married to her and had an embroidered pillow in her apartment in New York, reading "Her Cold and Reproduction"). thriller "Charada" was featured by Hepburn as a premature socialist whose husband was killed, and Grant – who appeared in four Hitchcock films – as a mysterious person who may or may not help her. that the master of voltage "does not have a genre".

Donin had three sons; Peter, the oldest, died in 2003 from a heart attack at the age of 50. His first wife, dancer Zhanna Coyne, later married Keli. His fourth wife was the star of the screen of Yvette Mimiyo. For the last two decades, his companion was director of comedian Elaine May.

None of his latest films did not go up to the heights of his most famous work. Nadir may have been in 1984 "Blame him on Rio", a comedy about a man (Michael Kane), who has a romance with his young daughter's friend. Roger Ebert put the film as "explicitly called to appeal to the brutal interests of dirty old men of all ages."

Other loans include the music segment for the 1980's television comedy "Moonlighting" and the stage production of Red Shoe. In 1999, he directed the ABC TV film "Love Letters", which featured Steven Weber and Laura Linnaeus.

"There is a limit on television," Donen said. try to find a way to wonder within. I'm always looking for limits, because then you have to be resourceful "

AlertMe


Source link